Exodus 14-28; 1 and 2 Thessalonians; Philemon

 

 

It is so easy to get bogged down in an onslaught of detail. Details are important. Details merit study and consideration. All Scripture is inspired (breathed out) by God, and is profitable . . .2 Timothy 3 reminds us. “All” means, yes, even the lists of names; even the measurements of buildings; even the selection of jewels for the breastplate. It is all profitable, or God would not have included it in his word.

Remember, though, that this venture is an “overview and a salt lick.” In an overview, you do not seek to absorb every single detail of every single word. You are reading to answer the generalized question — What do I learn about God? How does God relate to the different characters encountered in his word?

 



In this overview style of reading, you will encounter “salt lick” passages/chapters/books. Those are the ones that you say, “I want to come back to this and study deeper.” That is where you absorb detail, memorize, turn around to appreciate all the facets . . .

 



So, please, don’t give up because buildings and bowls and turbans and cubits are not your “cup of tea.” Appreciate the truth that God cares about detail. God is a God of order.  Consider “how” the different artisans made all of these various items (remember, they were slaves in Egypt for 430 years, and their “skill set” was making bricks from straw to construct pyramids. They did not engineer or decorate; they collected straw, mixed it with mud, put it in a form, let it dry, picked it up and put it where someone told them to put it). God gave them their skills, and their wisdom (Exodus 28).

 



Consider that God designed all of this detail so that he could meet with his people. (Exodus 25, for instance). The sovereign of all creation wants to meet personally with his people!

 





Consider the different laws and rules for how to interact as a society. Remember, they were slaves for 430 years (to give perspective, A.D. 1589 was 430 years before now, 2019). The Israelites had had no “voice” politically, or in the marketplace, or even in religious life, for longer than anyone could remember. And now, they were embarking on a journey to become a nation in a new place, with no experience. And God took the time to teach them how to live . . .

 

What else did you “consider” in your reading? Yes, I know that I didn’t even get to the Thessalonians . . . but you certainly are welcome to comment . . .